What is Spin Fit?

Spin fit classes can be a great way to get in a vigorous workout – burning calories and keeping your muscles in shape – especially during the off-season.  It’s a good cross training alternative to running and can really get you working hard.

It’s a good indoor workout and if you get the right motivational instructor, you can really get a lot from it. 

Pros

  • An effective workout
  • Allows you to train in the offseason
  • Varied routines keep things fresh
  • Great for all ability levels
  • You don’t have to wear your helmet 🙂

Cons

  • You’re not on a real bike
  • Classes can become monotonous
  • You have to push yourself for maximum effect

Description

  • Spinning classes are done in a fitness studio, with various light and music settings to create an energised atmosphere.
  • Instructors guide participants through workout phases. Warm-up, steady up tempo cadences, sprints, climbs, strength workouts, cool-downs.
  • You control resistance on your bike to make the pedaling as easy or difficult as you choose. Constant adjustment is normal.
  • All you’ll need is workout clothes, a towel (to wipe the sweat off) and a water bottle.
  • Spinning bikes have toe clips so you can wear tennis shoes. But many pedals also work with Shimano-style SPD cleats.

What Happens in a Spin fit Class?

Imagine a whole bunch of exercise bikes lined up inside a health club studio. Riders are on each one, spinning the pedals at a rapid pace. The lights are turned down, pumped up music fills the air and an instructor with a headset sits atop a lead bike, calling out commands.

“Climb out of the saddle,” she barks at the class. “Get it on!” (resistance that is)

The riders rise as one, pedals spinning faster as they grimace with exertion, sweat dripping off their bodies.

What you’re witnessing is a spin fit class, a workout option available at fitness clubs everywhere. Spin fit is a relatively recent phenomenon, where participants take part in a group workout on exercise bikes that typically lasts anywhere from 30-75 minutes. The classes are lead by instructors who normally guide participants through a series of phases, from warm-up to more challenging phases, to a period of peak effort followed by a cool down.

In spin fit classes, the intensity of the workout is influenced by a couple of things:

  • cadence, or pedal rate
  • resistance of the bike’s flywheel, which can be continually adjusted throughout the class to make pedaling easier or more difficult
  • by the rider’s body position, as they either pedal from a seated position or rise from the saddle.

Ultimately participants determine their own levels of exertion, something that works better for some than others.  I know that I do better when I’m being pushed and motivated by an instructor, especially Helen.  😛 

A good instructor can certainly encourage and motivate you to push yourself, and you’ll most likely find spin fit to be a vigorous workout. It’s a decent way to stay in shape when you don’t have a bike, or you can’t get outside on the bike.

You can do one session, or you can even build up to do two in a row! (I sometimes do 2 x 45 minute sessions – where I usually end up taking the second one a little bit easier than the first).  But beware… you will work hard and you will sweat! 😀

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1 Response to What is Spin Fit?

  1. Pingback: How I got to where I am today: you can do it too | Lorn Pearson Trains…

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